Long-Crowers

My family keeps chickens at our house in the country. I built a small coop called a “chicken tractor” in 2009. Many of these coop designs have wheels so you can easily move them over fresh grass for the birds to eat, scratch and fertilize. Check out “chicken tractors” on the internet to see the many different ways people house chickens nowadays – and often within city limits, when allowed.

If you don’t have a rooster, it’s quiet farming in the city. On the other hand, as with my family, if you do have a rooster, the neighbors are well aware. Ours is a Buff Orpington breed with a good strong crow at 10 months old. Thank goodness he’s not a Long-Crower!

Long-Crowers are raised for their loud sound and length of crow. The chicken breed with the longest crow is the Kosovo Drenica. Also known as Kosovo Long-Crowers, they are selectively bred for sound and duration of crow. Long-Crowers must have a crow that lasts at least 15 seconds. Weighing only four pounds, they can consistently crow for up to a full minute. Some people attribute this feat to superior lung capacity, while others believe it’s this breed’s relentless and aggressive nature.

When was the last time you heard a rooster’s cock-a-doodle? If it’s been a while, you’re invited out to Parky’s Farm in Winton Woods to try and hear one! It may remind you of a simpler time in your life or introduce your brood to a whole new world. There are other famous feathered squawkers at the farm as well: turkeys, ducks and a myriad of songbirds to name a few.

Eric King, Parky’s Farm